News


Special Offer – November 2019

by admin on November 5th, 2019

Category: Special Offers, Tags:

Nov Diabetes Offer

No Comments »


Pet of the month – November 2019

by admin on November 5th, 2019

Category: Pet of the Month, Tags:

Pet of the month for November is Hubble, a delightful Chocolate Labrador, seen here recovering from his fourth laparotomy to remove an intestinal foreign body; on this occasion we recovered a sock!

On previous occasions, in addition to socks, Hubble has swallowed a tea towel and a stone.

Let’s hope this is the last time!

Hubble 2

No Comments »


Canine Flank Alopecia

by admin on October 1st, 2019

Category: News, Tags:

What is canine flank alopecia?
Canine flank alopecia is a localised, often cyclic, disease of the hair follicles resulting in hair loss over the flanks of affected dogs. It is also known by the names cyclic flank alopecia, recurrent flank alopecia and seasonal flank alopecia, but these terms are not always accurate as the condition can appear at various times of the year, vary in duration, be continuous or be sporadic in nature.

What causes flank alopecia?
The cause of this condition is not known. However, as hair loss often occurs at times of the year when day length is at its shortest, light exposure may be involved. The mechanisms by which this might occur are not understood at present.

What are the clinical signs?
Canine flank alopecia occurs in dogs with ages ranging from 1 year to 11 years, although most cases develop between 3 and 6 years. This condition is seen more commonly in breeds such as Boxers, Airedale terriers, English Bulldogs and Schnauzers.

The condition causes areas of non-itchy hair loss over the flanks of affected dogs (Figure 1). The skin at the affected sites usually appears normal, although it often becomes very dark with pigmentation, and hair re-growth of a different colour sometimes occurs. Surrounding hair and skin is usually normal. Canine flank alopecia can occur on both sides of the dog or be limited to one side, and hair loss can also occur over the base of the back (Figure 2). The disease in some dogs is cyclic, with hair loss occurring at the same time each year and hair re-growth occurring in the times between. In other dogs, hair loss is more permanent, and no re-growth is seen following the initial loss. Some dogs are reported as only having one cycle of hair loss and re-growth in their lives.

How is it diagnosed?
The diagnosis of canine flank alopecia can often be made based on the clinical findings, since the lesions are so striking. Some hormonal diseases of dogs can present with non-itchy hair loss, so blood and urine tests may be warranted if there is a concern about these diseases.
Additionally, biopsies of affected skin can be taken which are then sent off for analysis at a laboratory. Biopsies can be supportive of a diagnosis of canine flank alopecia.

What are the treatments available?
Canine flank alopecia is a cosmetic disease. As dogs remain healthy, with many re-growing their hair eventually, a decision not to treat the affected dog is often taken.
If treatment is requested, melatonin is generally considered the treatment of choice as it is relatively safe and inexpensive. It is difficult to judge the response to medication though due to the high rate of spontaneous hair re-growth.

What is the outlook/prognosis?
The prognosis for this cosmetic disease is good, with dogs remaining systemically healthy despite unpredictable hair growth. The prognosis for full and normal hair re-growth at affected sites is also often good, but the disease is highly variable.

Seasonal_flank_alopecia

No Comments »


Pet of the month – October 2019

by admin on October 1st, 2019

Category: Pet of the Month, Tags:

We had a very lovely visitor today, meet Princess Buttercup!

Four years ago she came to us as a stray and suffering from a condition called Hydrocephalus, which means she had an increased volume of fluid surrounding her brain.

We also found out shortly after her arrival that she was pregnant and she gave birth at the practice a couple of weeks later!

Now all her kittens have grown up and been rehomed, Buttercup lives in a wonderful home and enjoys a very happy life.

Here she is having her annual vaccination.

Buttercup

No Comments »


Special Offer – October 2019

by admin on October 1st, 2019

Category: Special Offers, Tags:

Oct FIREWORKS

No Comments »


Nasal Disease

by admin on September 2nd, 2019

Category: News, Tags:

What diseases can affect the inside of the nose?

There are several different types of problem that can affect the nasal cavity of dogs and cats. The most common conditions in dogs include inflammation of the nasal cavity (rhinitis) and nasal tumours (cancer). Rhinitis in dogs can be due to a number of problems including allergy (called lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis), fungal infection (most commonly a fungus called Aspergillus) and foreign bodies (such as grass blades). In cats fungal disease is rare, whilst polyps (benign outgrowths of tissue) in the nose/ throat, rhinitis of unknown cause and tumours are more common. Bacterial infection can occur as a consequence of the underlying disease but does not cause nasal disease by itself.

What are the signs of nasal disease?

  • Sneezing
  • Snorting
  • Nasal discharge
  • Nose bleeds
  • Nasal pain
  • Nasal ulceration or loss of pigment around the nostrils
  • Reverse sneezing (this can look like spasms of choking or difficulty breathing and can be quite disturbing to see but is not a life threatening problem)

How is nasal disease diagnosed?
Bloods tests may be performed as part of an initial investigation, looking at general organ health prior to performing an anaesthetic or other tests. Sometimes blood tests are performed to look at how well the patient’s blood is clotting in patients with nose bleeds. Most commonly X-rays or a CT scan of the nasal cavity are performed under general anaesthesia and a procedure called rhinoscopy is carried out, in which an endoscope camera is inserted up the nose or used to look at the back of the throat.

Nasal X-rays may show damage to the small bones in the nose and they may reveal the presence of fluid or tumours. X-rays can sometimes look normal even when nasal disease is present, however.

A CT scan is a much more effective and sensitive way of detecting disease in the nose and will not uncommonly reveal abnormalities that haven’t shown up on an X-ray. A CT scan will also help to define the extent of any damage or the location of a tumour.

Rhinoscopy (passing a small camera inside the nose) is performed to look for abnormalities including fungal infection, tumours, and foreign bodies and to help take a tissue biopsy from the nose to send for analysis.

How is nasal disease treated?
The treatment for nasal disease depends upon its underlying cause and severity. Sometimes medication in the form of tablets is prescribed; anti-fungal solution must be put into the nose or the sinuses to treat the fungal infection Aspergillus, whilst either radiation therapy or chemotherapy may be required for the treatment of nasal tumours.

What is the long term outlook (prognosis)?
The long term outlook depends upon the underlying disease. Patients usually recover well from removal of a foreign body. Allergic rhinitis is not a life-threatening problem, but treatment is generally aimed at controlling rather than curing the problem and some patients may not respond as well as would be hoped. Aspergillus can respond well to therapy, but the condition may be recurrent and difficult to cure in some patients.
More specific advice and guidance about treatment of nasal disease for individual patients can be given once the diagnosis has been made and detailed information has been obtained from the diagnostic work-up.

Dog Boxer (1)

No Comments »


Pet of the month – September 2019

by admin on September 2nd, 2019

Category: Pet of the Month, Tags:

Pet of the Month for September is Max, it was his birthday last month and he was 10!

Although Max has reached his target weight on Sienna’s weight clinics, his owner still pops him in every 3 months to check his weight is stable.

If you haven’t heard of our weight clinics, for a £5 joining fee you and your pet receive a weight management booklet with tips on keeping your pet at a healthy weight, body condition score chart, measuring cup, calorie chart of common treats, food diary and leaflets on foods available to help your pet lose weight. All follow up appointments are free of charge.

Phone today to book an appointment with our weight management nurse Sienna!Max (1)

No Comments »


Special Offer – September 2019

by admin on September 2nd, 2019

Category: Special Offers, Tags:

Dental Offer Sep 19

No Comments »


Special Offer – August 2019

by admin on August 1st, 2019

Category: Special Offers, Tags:

Check a Lump

No Comments »


Spinal Fractures

by admin on August 1st, 2019

Category: News, Tags:

Spinal Fractures
Fractures (breaks) of the spine occur when dogs and cats are involved in road traffic accidents or suffer other major trauma such as a fall or running into a patio door. Spinal fractures are often associated with varying degrees of injury to the spinal cord (the bundle of nerves inside the vertebrae) and, therefore, nerve damage. Although many animals may be paralysed as a result of the fracture, they will often recover, provided that they retain the ability to feel pain and that they are managed appropriately. Some cases can be treated medically, but it is often necessary to consider surgery to stabilise a fractured spine.

What is involved in a spinal fracture?
In a spinal fracture, the bones (vertebrae) of the spine break (fracture) or come apart from each other (dislocate or luxate). Fracture of the spine usually occurs as a result of a significant injury, such as being hit by a car, although occasionally the bones in the spine may fracture with minimal, if any, trauma because they are already weakened by a condition such as a tumour (referred to as a ‘pathological fracture’).

When the vertebrae of the spine fracture or dislocate (luxate) the associated vertebral displacement often injures the nerves of the spinal cord. The concussion and compression of the spinal nerves affects nerve function, and the signs that develop may vary from only mild weakness through to paralysis (inability to voluntarily move the limbs). Severely affected patients may become incontinent and lose the ability to feel pain in their limbs and tail.

How are spinal fractures diagnosed?
Physical examination of the patient by the specialist may enable detection of instability of the spine or abnormal alignment of the spine. Importantly, examination also enables assessment of the severity of any associated spinal cord injury – in particular, whether or not the patient can still feel pain.

X-rays (radiographs) are often obtained to look for evidence of fracture (or luxation) of the vertebrae and are generally sufficient to make a diagnosis in the majority of cases. Occasionally a more advanced imaging technique is preferred, to provide additional detail of the spine. CT scanning is particularly good at looking at the bony detail of fractures which may not be apparent on normal X-rays. MRI scanning is not so good at detecting damage to bones of the spine, but it is excellent for assessing any damage to the spinal cord.

How are spinal fractures managed?
Spinal fractures (and luxations) are often emergencies because of the associated spinal cord injury and risk of further damage. As a result, they need to be treated with the minimum of delay. Affected dogs and cats are often in significant pain, and care should be taken to avoid the handler being bitten or scratched. Patients should be moved with great caution in case the spine (vertebral column) is unstable, as further movement may aggravate the injury and any nerve damage. Strapping the patient to a rigid board may be helpful in some cases.

Some fractures of the spine may be treated conservatively without the need for surgery. This is particularly appropriate in patients with relatively stable vertebrae and minimal spinal cord injury. Conversely, dogs and cats with unstable fractured spines, those with significant spinal cord injuries and those in severe pain are often best treated surgically. Surgery aims to re-align and stabilise the affected vertebrae. The procedure most often involves placing screws or pins in the bones on either side of the fracture (or luxation) and securing them with either a plate or cement.

What is the outlook (prognosis) in patients with spinal fractures?
The outlook in dogs and cats with spinal fracture is primarily dependent on the severity of the spinal cord injury and how the patient is treated. Provided the ability to feel pain in the limbs and tail is maintained and the patient is managed appropriately, the outlook is generally good. Recovery may take a number of weeks (or even months in severely affected cases) and supportive care, including physiotherapy/hydrotherapy exercises, may be necessary. In contrast, patients with spinal fractures that can no longer feel pain are very unlikely to recover, no matter how they are treated, since the spinal cord injury is generally severe and irreversible.

 SPINE LUXATION

No Comments »