Archive for February, 2017

Special Offer – February 2017 – Neutering

by admin on February 1st, 2017

Category: Special Offers, Tags:

February Offer 2017 - Neutering

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Pet of the Month – February 2017 – Hadley

by admin on February 1st, 2017

Category: Pet of the Month, Tags:

Hadley has featured in this column before and his return to this newsletter is to highlight the need for vigilance in respect of skin tumours. Hadley suffers from a very serious form of skin cancer called a Mast Cell Tumour (MCT), and he is recovering very well following surgery to remove yet another recurrence. MCT can be very deceptive as they often start as small bumps which may remain static for many months before growing larger. It can be extremely difficult to contain, frequently recurs and may be life threatening.

MCT is the most common skin tumour in dogs; it can also affect other areas of the body, including the spleen, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and bone marrow. MCT represent a cancer of a type of blood cell normally involved in the body’s response to allergens and inflammation. Certain dogs are predisposed to MCT, including brachycephalic (flat-faced) breeds such as Boston Terriers, Boxers, Pugs, and Bulldogs, as well as retriever breeds, though any breed of dog can develop MCT.

When they occur on the skin, MCT varies widely in appearance. They can be a raised lump or bump on or just under the skin, and may be red, ulcerated, or swollen. In addition, many owners will report a waxing and waning size of the tumour, which can occur spontaneously or can be produced by agitation of the tumour, causing degranulation. Mast cells contain granules filled with substances which can be released into the bloodstream and potentially cause systemic problems, including stomach ulceration and bleeding, swelling and redness at and around the tumour site, and potentially life-threatening complications, such as a dangerous drop in blood pressure and a systemic inflammatory response leading to shock.

When MCT occur on the skin, they can occur anywhere on the body. The biological behaviour of these tumours can vary widely; some may be present for many months without growing much, while others can appear suddenly and grow very quickly. The most common sites of MCT spread (metastasis) are the lymph nodes, spleen and liver.

Diagnosis can be simply achieved via a fine needle aspirate. This requires no anesthesia and only rarely sedation. Early identification and surgical removal are key to the most favourable outcomes however aggressive forms may require radical surgery and necessitate referral to a specialist cancer referral centre.

Hadley initially found the operation sites to be very itchy after surgery, something not uncommon with MCT. After removing a few of his own sutures Hadley was given additional medication, resutured and had to wear a full body suit! We are pleased to report he is making very good progress.

Hadley Pet of the month Feb 2017

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Head Tilt In Dogs

by admin on February 1st, 2017

Category: News, Tags:

What does it mean if my dog has a Head Tilt?

A persistent head tilt is a sign of a balance (vestibular) centre problem in dogs. It is very similar to ‘vertigo’ in people and is often accompanied by a ‘drunken’ walk and involuntary eye movements, either side to side or up and down.

The feeling that the room is spinning due to the eye movements is what causes a feeling of nausea in both people and dogs. The signs may not be as severe as mentioned here and can just consist of a mild head tilt. Signs often seen associated with a head tilt but unassociated with balance abnormalities include a facial ‘droop’ and deafness.

Causes of a head tilt

A head tilt represents a disorder of the balance centre. However, the balance centre resides in the inner bony portion of the ear as well as the brain. So a head tilt could represent a simple ear problem or a very serious brain disease.

Ear problems which are responsible for head tilts include:

  • Infections
  • Polyps
  • Reactions to topical drops or solutions if the ear drum is damaged
  • Hits to the head
  • (Occasionally) ear tumours
  • (Rarely) a genetic abnormality affecting puppies, especially those of the Doberman breed
  • Idiopathic vestibular disease

The most common cause is what is called idiopathic vestibular disease. There is no known cause of this disease, a variant of which is also seen in people. The signs can start very suddenly and be accompanied by vomiting in severe cases. This condition, however, will resolve given time without any specific treatment.

Brain diseases responsible for balance centre dysfunction can include:

  • Tumours
  • Trauma
  • Inflammation
  • Stroke
  • Rarely, similar signs can be seen in dogs that are receiving a specific antibiotic called metronidazole. Recovery will often take place within days of stopping this medication

Clinical signs of vestibular disease – is it the ear or is it the brain?

In addition to a head tilt, signs of vestibular disease (balance centre dysfunction) include ataxia (a drunken, falling gait) and nystagmus (involuntary eye movements). There are several signs to look for which help separate out whether the origin of the disease is inner ear or brainstem (Central Nervous system – CNS).

Central nervous system localisation will often be associated with weakness on one side of the body that can manifest as ‘scuffing’ or even dragging of the legs, in addition to lethargy, and sometimes problems eating and swallowing, or loss of muscle over the head.

A balance problem associated with an inner ear disease is not likely to be associated with any of these signs. However, some dogs will exhibit a droopy face and a small pupil on the same side as the head tilt.


Tests recommended for a dog with a head tilt

Evaluation of an animal with a head tilt includes physical and neurologic examinations, routine laboratory tests, and sometimes x-rays. Your veterinary surgeon may carry out a thorough inspection of the ear canal, which may require sedation of your dog – this can be useful to rule out obvious growths or infections. Additional tests may be recommended based on the results of these tests or if a metabolic or toxic cause is suspected. Identification of specific brain disorders requires imaging of the brain, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Collection and examination of cerebrospinal fluid, which surrounds the brain, is often helpful in the diagnosis of certain inflammations or infections of the brain.


How do we treat head tilt in dogs

Treatment for vestibular dysfunction will focus on the underlying cause once a specific diagnosis has been made. Supportive care consists of administering drugs to reduce associated nausea and/or vomiting. Travel sickness drugs can be very effective. These must only be given following advice from your veterinary surgeon. Protected activity rather than restricted activity should be encouraged as this will potentially speed the improvement of the balance issues.


Outlook (prognosis) for head tilt in dogs

The prognosis depends on the underlying cause. The prognosis is good if the underlying disease can be resolved and guarded if it cannot be treated. The prognosis for animals with an idiopathic vestibular disease is usually good because the clinical signs can improve within a couple of months.

Dog with head tilt

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